He who wants to plant corn must make peace with the crows. - African Proverb

With love from The African Gourmet

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Fair Trade Africa Chocolate

Fair Trade Africa Chocolate

Fair Trade Africa Chocolate



Chances are the chocolate you are eating originated from Africa

Fair Trade Chocolate

Fair Trade Chocolate
Fair Trade Chocolate

West Africa produces 70 percent of the world’s cocoa beans. Many African countries now grow cocoa trees, Sierra Leone, Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Nigeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Congo but the main producers are Ghana, Nigeria and Cote d'Ivoire. Cocoa farmers in West Africa, where 70 percent of the world’s cocoa comes from, can earn as little as .25 to .50 cents a day.

Ironically, many Africans have never tasted the finished chocolate product due to the high cost of producing the product. Most African Cocoa farmers sell their cocoa harvest to an intermediary in similar conditions of a tenant farmer and sharecropper. News outlets report daily on child slavery on cocoa farms. According to a study conducted by Tulane University, the number of children working in cocoa industry increased by 46 percent in Cote d'Ivoire between 2009 and 2010. The widespread use of children in cocoa production is controversial, not only for the concerns about child labor and exploitation, but also because, as of 2015, up to 19,000 children working in Côte d'Ivoire, the world's biggest producer of cocoa, may have been victims of trafficking or slavery.

Chocolate sweet deliciousness

Cocoa is used to make the world’s most beloved sweet treat, chocolate. No other natural food product can be said to serve equally well as food or drink, or to possess the nourishing and stimulating properties as cocoa. The next time you have a chocolate craving or you give a gift for a special occasion to your sweetheart, chances are that piece of chocolate originated from Africa. However if you or your sweetheart crave chocolate and you want to keep a clear conscience, look for fair trade chocolates. 

Africa does not benefit from the processing and manufacturing portion of chocolate, only the agricultural. Fair Trade helps the small family cocoa growers and does not endorse poverty and exploitation of poor agricultural coffee growing regions.


Fair Trade certified products including chocolate are part of a trading partnership that seeks greater equity in international trade. Fair Trade helps with sustainable development by offering better trading conditions and securing the rights of farmers and workers around the world.


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