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About Us

Why are we here?
Since its founding in 2008, Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet goal is to highlight Africa through her food and culture. 
Facts about the African continent countries and regions are endless, just look at the map of Africa vastness of a people, culture, food and living and ancient history.




Who is Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet


Chic African Culture is the brainchild of Ivy Newton a graduate of Florida A & M University in Tallahassee Florida. Ms. Newton’s family history has tentacles on two different continents, Africa and America.

The African country of Mozambique in Southeast Africa is her country of origin, specifically from the tourist and fishing port town of Porto Amelia now known as Pemba. Her family's occupation is that of fishing, fishing in the Mozambique Channel is the lifeblood of the family.

Many of The African Gourmet, cooking and recipe division of Chic African Culture, recipes derive from Mozambique with limitless seafood recipes. Many recipes from The African Gourmet gleam directly from family and friends still living in Mozambique and every African country.



Why are we here?

Since its founding in 2008, Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet goal is to highlight Africa through her food and culture. The objective is to show true facts about Africa and its 54 vastly diverse troubled yet intensely uplifting countries with the hopes of inspiring old and new souls.

Africa is inspirational and has much more to more than just poverty porn, war, and immigrants. We are here making our mark in the respective field of truth about Africa because Africa is worthy of respect and love. Images of Africa and African people in the media tend to be quite negative; while no place on earth is 100 percent positive, no place is 100 percent negative.

Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, the living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet Morrua Mozambique is home
Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet Morrua Mozambique is home

Family recipe Mozambique coconut crab stew recipe is made of fresh crab and coconut, staples in our Mozambique coastal cooking.

Family recipe Mozambique coconut crab stew recipe is made of fresh crab and coconut, staples in our Mozambique coastal cooking.

Make Easy Stewed Mozambique Crab Coconut Recipe
Serves 4

Easy African food recipe

Total time from start to finish 55 minutes

Ingredients
1/4 pound fresh crab meat
1 large onion diced
2 large tomatoes chopped
2 garlic cloves crushed
1 small fresh ginger grated
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 hot pepper diced
1/3 cup coconut milk
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons cooking oil

Directions
Heat the oil in a large pan and fry onion and spices for about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, peanut butter and coconut milk simmer 20 minutes or until slightly thick. Add crabmeat. Serve with rice.
Mozambique was once one of the largest coconut or coqueros, as they are locally called, producers in the world until 2011 when Lethal Yellowing (LY) spread across the African country, plummeting a once-thriving industry into chaos.

Africa


Facts about Africa and its 54 vastly diverse troubled yet intensely uplifting countries
Contact us: culture1africangourmet@gmail.com 

Copyright 2019 all rights reserved


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